Food Waste/Lebensmittelverschwendung

Avocados & Food Waste (EN)

#zerofoodwaste

That is my motto in everyday life, no matter whether I am at home or on the road. However, I remember situations where I had to throw away avocados because they were just not edible (anymore). The butter fruit rarely has the right consistency for eating, it is often too hard, too soft, or has turned brown all too quickly. How much food waste do avocados really create? In this article, I follow the value chain of the avocado.

Documentation on avocado food waste remains patchy. In Kenya, it is 30000 to 40000 tons of the annual production of 81000 tons, almost 50%[1]. This figure includes many causes on the production side, but not the food waste that occurs during and after export. The percentage can be considered representative of most major avocado exporters. Expect even higher wastage when we account for consumer and retail waste!

Agenda

  1. Food waste along the value chain
  2. How do I recognize ripe avocados?
  3. How do you store cut avocados?
  4. What do I do with the pit and skin?
  1. Food waste along the value chain

Many avocados get damaged during cultivation and harvesting. There are many reasons for this: incorrect harvesting practices, poor harvest management, pests and diseases all play a role[2]. This can be improved through more knowledge as well as the use of varieties that are best suited for the respective region.

During transport, avocados are not only refrigerated, but also stored in a special atmosphere. It contains more carbon dioxide and less oxygen, which slows down the ripening process[3]. But if the temperature is too cold, this leads to discoloration of the butter fruit, which is only noticed by the consumer at home. This cold damage is also known from mangoes.

For example, the British company Martin Lishman developed an electric avocado that corresponds to the shape, size and weight of the original avocado. This makes it easier to recognize which actions cause damage during transport. Agricola Ocoa, a Colombian avocado farmer, is currently trying out the electric avocado on his crop. This allows the company to develop appropriate measures to transport its avocados more safely[4]. The company Apeel Sciences has developed a plant-based coating that makes the permeable skin lose less moisture and oxygen. In the US, this has led to a 50% reduction in wastage of avocados in US supermarkets, and these avocados are already available in supermarkets in Germany.

But even shorter transport can prevent a lot of crop damage. Therefore, I recommend you to buy avocados from the region. This way you can reduce food waste caused by transport.

2. How do I recognize ripe avocados?

In retail stores, it is often difficult for both staff and consumers to tell how ripe the avocado is and when it is past the ideal eating point. With many other fruits or vegetables, such as berries, this is easier to decide thanks to the lack of skin.

Students from Harvard have therefore developed a sensor that can measure the degree of ripeness of an avocado and also indicate how many days it will keep. Researchers at the British Cranfield University use lasers and vibrations. This makes it easier and more accurate for the uninitiated to assess the ripeness of avocados without damaging the avocado.

Even if your supermarket or market trader doesn’t use these methods, you can look for avocados with different degrees of ripeness yourself—depending on the day you want to eat the butter fruit. If the avocado skin gives slightly when pressed, it is ready to eat. Hard avocados, on the other hand, need to ripen at room temperature. Another trick is to pull out the stem. When it comes off easily and the flesh underneath is green, the avocado is ready to eat. However, this is not appreciated in the market or supermarket as it damages the avocado and makes it spoil faster.

Don’t be too impatient when opening the avocado: because once cut open, the avocado will not continue to ripen in its whole state. To speed up the ripening process, it is also said to help to place the avocado between ripe bananas[5]. If you have mistakenly opened an unripe avocado, you can ripen it further by soaking it in vinegar, salt and sugar. You will find detailed instructions in the footnote here[6].

3. How do you store cut avocados?

It’s best not to store them at all, they oxidise quickly and turn brown. Instead of wrapping them in cling film, I often put avocado halves with the cut-side down in a small bowl and cover them airtight. Apply a little lemon juice before. Alternatively, store the avocado half with its pit, as this also prevents browning. This way the avocado will last 1-2 days longer. For avocado lovers, there are also cute sets to buy that simplify both storage and ripening. You don’t really need them in my opinion, but they are a nice gift idea for a big avocado fan[7].

Avocados that already have small brown spots are still safe to eat. Just cut them away. Mouldy avocados must be thrown away unfortunately (this applies to fruit and vegetables in general).

4. What do I do with the pit and skin?

You can plant the avocado pit and grow a small tree from it. In the Central European climate, it will also grow but rarely bear edible fruits.

To eat the seed, you can remove the skin and grate it finely to turn it into powder. You can add this to smoothie bowls or muesli, for example. And unlike the avocado itself, it can be kept for a long time. It is important to dry the powder well before storing it so that it does not spoil. However, there are mixed opinions on the consumption of the powder – consumer protection officials point out that it also contains the bitter substance persin, which is not considered dangerous for humans in small quantities[8]. The consumption of avocado pits has not yet been sufficiently studied, thus I am not able to make a conclusive statement. If you like the taste of avocado pits, use them in moderation and not in masses.

A US company, Reveal, processes avocado waste into a wellness drink. For this purpose, the antioxidants are extracted and utilized with some other ingredients. To date, the drink is only available in the USA . However, it seems to be an exciting and safe way to enjoy the valuable antioxidants from the avocado[9].

Otherwise, check out whether avocado pits are suitable for you as a hair treatment: there is a recipe for this in the footnote, but I use less or no oil, depending on the condition of my hair[10]. On another note, I also use the kernel as a toy for Yuna, my cat 😊

This article shows that there are many good ways to prevent food waste along the value chain, both as a producer and as a consumer. You and your company can determine the ripeness of avocados yourself and thus enjoy more avocados of higher quality with less money.

But do avocados basically fit into a sustainable consumption style? After all, compared to other fruits and vegetables, avocados have a comparatively poor environmental balance. So should we avoid them altogether? Read more about „forbidden foods“ and whether you should actually consume avocados from an environmental point of view in the next article.


[1] https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lusike-Wasilwa/publication/267683079_STATUS_OF_AVOCADO_PRODUCTION_IN_KENYA/links/58f5ae67a6fdcc11e56a0129/STATUS-OF-AVOCADO-PRODUCTION-IN-KENYA.pdf?origin=publication_detail

[2] https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lusike-Wasilwa/publication/267683079_STATUS_OF_AVOCADO_PRODUCTION_IN_KENYA/links/58f5ae67a6fdcc11e56a0129/STATUS-OF-AVOCADO-PRODUCTION-IN-KENYA.pdf?origin=publication_detail

[3] https://www.hapag-lloyd.com/de/company/about-us/newsletter/2015/06/a-cool-journey-for-fresh-avocados_41181.html

[4] https://www.fruitnet.com/eurofruit/electronic-avocado-helps-cut-food-waste/185554.article

[5] https://www.rohkost24.net/avocado-lagern

[6] https://www.springlane.de/magazin/avocado-reifen-lassen/

[7] https://mr-green.ch/products/set-zero-avocado-waste

[8] https://www.verbraucherzentrale.de/wissen/lebensmittel/nahrungsergaenzungsmittel/avocadokerne-lieber-nicht-13836

[9] https://www.drinkreveal.com/

[10] https://www.smarticular.net/erstaunliche-anwendungen-fuer-avocadokerne-nie-wieder-wegwerfen/

Avocado & Food Waste

No food waste! Das ist mein Motto im Alltag, ob zu Hause oder unterwegs. Doch gerade bei Avocados musste auch ich öfter mal etwas wegwerfen (besonders wenn sie gedumpstert sind). Selten hat die Butterfrucht die richtige Konsistenz zum Verzehr, oft ist sie zu hart, zu weich oder wird  braun. Wie viel Food Waste entsteht durch Avocados wirklich? In diesem Artikel verfolge ich die Wertschöpfungskette der Avocado. Du erfährst hier auf einen Blick, wie und wo die Butterfrucht verschwendet wird und wie man das vermeiden könnte.

Zum Thema Food Waste bei Avocados gibt es, wie bei den meisten einzelnen Lebensmitteln, eine lückenhafte Dokumentation. In Kenia sind es 30000 bis 40000 Tonnen der Jahresproduktion von 81000 Tonnen[1], also fast 50%. In diese Zahl sind viele Ursachen auf der Produktionsseite mit eingerechnet, jedoch nicht die Lebensmittelverschwendung, die während und nach dem Export entsteht. Die Prozentangabe kann als repräsentativ für die meisten großen Avocadoexporteure angesehen werden.

Inhalt

  1. Food Waste entlang der Wertschöpfungskette
  2. Wie erkenne ich reife Avocados?
  3. Wie bewahrt man angeschnittene Avocados auf?
  4. Was mache ich mit Kern und Schale?
  1. Food Waste entlang der Wertschöpfungskette

Bei Anbau und Ernte gehen bereits viele Avocados zu Bruch. Die Ursachen dafür sind vielseitig: Falsche Erntepraktiken, schlechtes Erntemanagement sowie Schädlinge und Krankheiten spielen dabei eine Rolle[2]. Durch mehr Wissen sowie den Einsatz von Varianten, die sich für die jeweilige Region am besten eignen, kann dies verbessert werden.

Während des Transports werden Avocados nicht nur gekühlt, sondern auch in einer Spezialatmosphäre gelagert. Sie enthält mehr Kohlendioxid und weniger Sauerstoff, was den Reifungsprozess verlangsamt[3]. Doch wenn die Temperatur zu kalt ist, führt das zu unschönen Verfärbungen der Butterfrucht, die erst vom Konsumenten zu Hause bemerkt wird. Dieser Kälteschaden ist auch von Mangos bekannt.

Um sonstige Transportschäden zu erkennnen, gibt es bereits Technologie: Beispielsweise entwickelte das britische Unternehmen Martin Lishman eine elektrische Avocado, die in Form, Größe und Gewicht der originalen Avocado entspricht. Mit ihr lässt sich einfacher erkennen, durch welche Handlungen beim Transport Schäden entstehen. Agricola Ocoa, ein kolumbianischer Avocadofarmer, probiert die elektrische Avocado gerade mit seinem Erntegut aus. So kann das Unternehmen geeignete Maßnahmen entwickeln, um seine Avocados sicherer zu transportieren[4]. Das Unternehmen Apeel Sciences hat eine pflanzenbasierte Beschichtung entwickelt, die die durchlässige Schale weniger Feuchtigkeit und Sauerstoff verlieren lässt. In den US führte das zu einer 50%-igen Reduktion der Verschwendung von Avocados in US-amerikanischen Supermärkten, und auch in Deutschland sind diese Avocados bereits in Supermärkten erhältlich.

Doch auch durch kürzeren Transport können sehr viele Ernteschäden vermieden werden. Achte beim Avocadokauf darauf, Avocados aus der Region zu beziehen. So kannst du bereits transportbedingte Lebensmittelverschwendung geringer halten.

2. Wie erkenne ich reife Avocados?

Im Einzelhandel ist es sowohl für das Personal als auch für Konsumenten oft schwer zu sagen, wie reif die Avocado ist und wann sie über dem idealen Verzehrszeitpunkt liegt. Bei vielen anderen Obst- oder Gemüsesorten wie z.B. Beeren ist das dank der fehlenden Schale einfacher zu entscheiden.

Studierende aus Harvard haben daher einen Sensor entwickelt, der den Reifegrad einer Avocado messen kann und auch anzeigt, wie viele Tage sich die Avocado noch hält. Forscher der britischen Cranfield-Universität nutzen Laser und Vibrationen. Damit können auch Unwissende den Reifegrad von Avocados einfacher und akkurater einschätzen, ohne die Avocado dabei zu beschädigen.

Auch wenn dein Supermarkt oder Markthändler diese Methoden nicht einsetzt, kannst du selbst gezielt nach Avocados mit verschiedenen Reifegraden Ausschau halten – je nachdem, an welchem Tag du die Butterfrucht essen möchtest. Wenn die Avocadoschale bei Druck leicht nachgibt, ist sie bereit zum Verzehr. Harte Avocados hingegen müssen bei Zimmertemperatur nachreifen. Ein weiterer Trick ist es, den Stiel herauszuziehen. Wenn er sich leicht lösen lässt und das Fruchtfleisch darunter grün ist, ist die Avocado bereit zum Verzehr. Dies wird jedoch im Markt bzw. Supermarkt nicht gerne gesehen, da es ja die Avocado beschädigt und sie schneller verderben lässt.

Sei beim Öffnen der Avocado nicht zu ungeduldig: Denn einmal aufgeschnitten reift die Avocado im ganzen Zustand nicht weiter. Um den Reifungsprozess zu beschleunigen, soll es auch helfen, die Avocado zwischen reife Bananen zu legen[5]. Wenn du fälschlicherweise doch einmal eine unreife Avocado geöffnet hast, kannst du sie durch Einlegen in Essig, Salz und Zucker weiterreifen lassen. Eine genaue Anleitung findest du in der Fußnote[6].

3.Wie bewahrt man angeschnittene Avocados auf?

Am besten gar nicht, sie oxidieren schnell und werden braun. Anstatt sie in Frischhaltefolie einzuwickeln, lege ich Avocadohälften oft mit der Schnittfläche nach unten in eine kleine Schale und decke diese luftdicht ab. Davor kannst du sie noch mit etwas Zitronensaft einreiben. Alternativ hilft es auch, die Hälfte mit dem Kern aufzubewahren, da dieser die Braunfärbung ebenfalls verhindert. So hält die Avocado noch 1-2 Tage länger. Für Avocadoliebhaber gibt es auch niedliche Sets zu kaufen, die sowohl die Aufbewahrung als auch das Reifen vereinfachen. Sie sind nicht unbedingt notwendig, aber für einen großen Avocadofan eine ganz nette Geschenkidee[7].

Avocados, die bereits kleine braune Stellen haben, kannst du noch gefahrlos essen. Schneide sie einfach weg. Schimmlige Avocados sollten nicht mehr verzehrt werden (gilt allgemein für Obst und Gemüse).

4. Was mache ich mit Kern und Schale?

Den Avocadokern kannst du einpflanzen und daraus ein kleines Bäumchen ziehen. Im mitteleuropäsichen Klima wächst dieses auch heran, trägt aber in den seltensten Fällen genießbare Früchte.

Zum Genuss des Kerns kannst du die Haut entfernen und ihn fein reiben, sodass der zu Pulver wird. Das kannst du z.B. Smoothiebowls oder Müslis beigeben. Und im Gegensatz zur Avocado selbst ist es auch noch haltbar. Wichtig ist es, das Pulver vor der Lagerung gut zu trocknen, damit es nicht verdirbt. Zum Verzehr des Pulvers gibt es jedoch gemischte Meinungen – Verbraucherzentralen weisen darauf hin, dass es auch den Bitterstoff Persin enthält, der für Menschen in geringen Mengen als nicht gefährlich gilt[8]. Doch insgesamt ist der Verzehr des Avocadokerns noch nicht ausreichend untersucht, sodass sich dazu keine abschließende Aussage treffen lässt. Wenn dir der Geschmack des Avocadokerns zusagt, nutze ihn in Maßen und nicht in Massen.

Ein US-amerikanisches Unternehmen, Reveal, verarbeitet Avocadoabfälle zu einem Wellness-Drink. Dazu werden die Antioxidantien extrahiert und mit einigen anderen Zutaten verwertet. Bis dato ist das Getränk nur in den USA erhältlich[9]. Mir scheint es jedoch eine spannende und sichere Möglichkeit, die wertvollen Antioxidantien aus der Avocado zu genießen.

Ansonsten kannst du auch ausprobieren, inwiefern sich Avocadokerne für dich als Haarkur eignen: Es gibt dazu ein Rezept in der Fußnote, ich nehme hier allerdings je nach Zustand der Haare weniger bis gar kein Öl[10]. Ich verwende den Kern sonst auch als Spielzeug für Yuna, meinen Kater.

Dieser Artikel zeigt, dass es sehr viele gute Methoden gibt, um Lebensmittelverschwendung entlang der Wertschöpfungskette sowohl als Produzent als auch als Konsument zu verhindern. Du kannst den Reifegrad von Avocados selbst bestimmen und so mit weniger Geld mehr Avocados von höherer Qualität genießen.

Doch passen Avocados grundsätzlich zu einem nachhaltigen Konsumstil? Die Avocado hat ja verglichen mit anderen Obst- und Gemüsesorten eine vergleichsweise schlechte Umweltbilanz. Sollten wie sie also lieber komplett weglassen? Mehr von „verbotenen Lebensmitteln“ und wie du wirklich nachhaltig Avocaodos konsumieren kannst, erfährst du im nächsten Artikel.


[1] https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lusike-Wasilwa/publication/267683079_STATUS_OF_AVOCADO_PRODUCTION_IN_KENYA/links/58f5ae67a6fdcc11e56a0129/STATUS-OF-AVOCADO-PRODUCTION-IN-KENYA.pdf?origin=publication_detail

[2] https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lusike-Wasilwa/publication/267683079_STATUS_OF_AVOCADO_PRODUCTION_IN_KENYA/links/58f5ae67a6fdcc11e56a0129/STATUS-OF-AVOCADO-PRODUCTION-IN-KENYA.pdf?origin=publication_detail

[3] https://www.hapag-lloyd.com/de/company/about-us/newsletter/2015/06/a-cool-journey-for-fresh-avocados_41181.html

[4] https://www.fruitnet.com/eurofruit/electronic-avocado-helps-cut-food-waste/185554.article

[5] https://www.rohkost24.net/avocado-lagern

[6] https://www.springlane.de/magazin/avocado-reifen-lassen/

[7] https://mr-green.ch/products/set-zero-avocado-waste

[8] https://www.verbraucherzentrale.de/wissen/lebensmittel/nahrungsergaenzungsmittel/avocadokerne-lieber-nicht-13836

[9] https://www.drinkreveal.com/

[10] https://www.smarticular.net/erstaunliche-anwendungen-fuer-avocadokerne-nie-wieder-wegwerfen/

Reis Teil III – Social Sustainability und Food Waste

Rice, Baby, Rice!

Vielen Dank für das Beitragsbild an moritz 320!

Soziale Nachhaltigkeit, die Ökobilanz und Food Waste bei Reis: Das sind die Themen von Teil III meiner Reisserie. Und das trifft sich gut, denn mittlerweile wohne ich für mein Praktikum in Singapur und Reis ist wieder eines meiner Hauptnahrungsmittel geworden. Also ran ans Reisfeld bzw. im späteren Verlauf dieses Artikels an den Kochtopf!
(mehr …)

Social Sustainability and Food Waste – Rice Part III

Rice, baby, Rice!

Thank you very much for the photo of a ricebowl @moritz 320!

Social sustainability, the life cycle assessment and rice food waste: These are the topics of part III, the last article of my rice series. And that’s a good thing, because meanwhile I live in Singapore for my internship and rice has again become one of my staple foods. So let’s go to the rice field and later in this article proceed to the cooking pot!
(mehr …)

„Nicht alles ist Mist“ – ein kompakter Guide für weniger Food Waste bei dir zu Hause

Kürzlich habe ich das Buch „Nicht alles ist Mist“ von Angelika Kirchmaier gelesen. Ich erhielt mein Exemplar in elektronischer Version, da ich ja momentan im Ausland bin und ich zudem aufgrund von Zero Waste verstärkt auf E-Versionen zurückgreife. Herzlichen Dank an Monika Resler für die Zusendung!
(mehr …)

Interview mit Agon von Project Nightfall: Mein Food Waste Video

Einen Artikel wie diesen gab es noch nie: Denn es ist das erste Mal, dass ich ein Interview hier auf Waste’s End poste. Ich habe mit Agon, einem Videokünstler aus Großbritannien über sein erstes Food Waste Video gesprochen. Hier findet ihr es (nur auf Englisch verfügbar): Link
(mehr …)

Interview with Agon, Project Nightfall: My video about food waste

Hey there! This time, I post the english version first because the last article was german only. This article is a special one as it is the first time I post an interview here on my blog. I talked with Agon about his motivation to create a food waste video 🙂 here we go:
(mehr …)

Gastbeitrag Containering & Aktion gegen Papiermüll in Zusammenarbeit mit Wiado

Gastbeitrag Containering

Containering fasziniert immer mehr Menschen. Umso mehr freue ich mich, euch nun meinen Gastbeitrag auf Wiado, einem deutschen Onlinemagazin rund um Familie, Haushalt und Verbraucher zeigen zu können. Klick einfach hier: Gastbeitrag Containering !
(mehr …)

Zero Waste without a special Zero Waste store? Unconventional alternatives to „traditional“ in-store purchasing

„Can you live Zero Waste without going to a Zero Waste store?

Many people who are interested in Zero Waste have already asked me this question. They live in the countryside, do not have a car or a special Zero Waste store nearby or for other reasons have no opportunity to shop regularly in a special Zero Waste store.
(mehr …)

Zero Waste ohne Unverpacktladen? Unkonventionelle Alternativen zum klassischen Einkauf im Geschäft

“Kann man Zero Waste leben, ohne im Unverpacktladen einzukaufen?“

Diese Frage haben mir schon viele Menschen gestellt, die an Zero Waste interessiert sind. Sie leben auf dem Land, haben kein Auto bzw. keinen Unverpacktladen in der Nähe oder haben aus anderen Gründen keine Möglichkeit, regelmäßig im Unverpacktladen einzukaufen.

(mehr …)